What’s Colorado Proposition 110: Sales tax increase for transportation

Denver Post » Proposition 110 would increase the state sales tax from 2.9 percent to 3.52 percent for the next 20 years to fund state and local transportation projects, including new roads, maintenance of existing roads and debt repayment. Revenue would go to the state (45 percent), local governments (40 percent) and multimodal transportation projects (15 percent).

2018-10-23T11:09:49+00:00October 12th, 2018|Bridges, Colorado, Highways, Roads, Uncategorized|

USDOT providing nearly $64B for transportation investments

Transportation Today » The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) will make available more than $63.9 billion in multimodal discretionary and formula transportation investments by the end of fiscal year 2018. DOT will also make available $1.6 billion in FY 2017 discretionary funds.

2018-10-22T13:50:21+00:00October 12th, 2018|Alternative Transit on Roads, Bridges, Funding, Highways, Roads, U.S. News|

Candidates for governor eye Georgia’s transportation needs

Politically Georgia » The candidates for Georgia governor say more must be done to tackle traffic and improve transportation across the Peach State. But Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp offer different visions of what should be done and how to pay for it.

2018-10-23T10:08:44+00:00October 11th, 2018|Bridges, Georgia, Highways, Roads|

Bridge shake test is part of earthquake engineering research for Caltran

Nevada Today » The massive “shake table” at the University of Nevada, Reno, symbolizes a partnership with Caltrans that tests innovative bridge designs that are quick to construct, stand up better to big earthquakes and, when damaged, can be easily repaired.

2018-10-22T14:05:31+00:00October 11th, 2018|Bridges, U.S. News|

Trump’s Failed Infrastructure Plan Is a Wasted Opportunity

Governing » The need is indeed enormous. The American Society of Civil Engineers has graded the nation’s infrastructure as a D+ and warned that its deterioration is harming the nation’s ability to compete in the global economy. In the early days after Trump’s inauguration, Republican strategist Steve Bannon predicted that infrastructure would give the president an added bonus, the key to “an entirely new political movement, as exciting as the 1930s,” even “greater than the Reagan revolution.” It was such a good idea, the White House believed, that Trump’s team boosted the target to $1.5 trillion. But nearly two years after the election, the plan is by all reports dead. Everyone seems to love the idea of investment in infrastructure, but no one has figured out how to pay for it.

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